Tips to ensure your social media accounts help, not hurt your job search!

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There’s no doubt that Social media is a key player in the job search process today.

Half of all job seekers are active on social networking sites on a daily basis, and more than a third of all employers utilise these sites in their hiring process.

Social media sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ enables potential employers to get a feel for who you are outside the confines of a CV, cover letter, or a job interview.

It also works the other way around; with businesses and employers offering job seekers the opportunity to learn about them, how they operate and what companies they’re interested in. Amongst other things, it allows job seekers to connect with current and former employees; and hear about job openings instantaneously.

A survey conducted by CareerBuilder.com found that 37% of employers use social networks to screen potential job candidates and some base their hiring decision on what they find. 65% said they do it to see if the job seeker presents himself or herself ‘professionally.’

All that is great, but (and there is always a but), if your social media accounts give the wrong impression to an employer, then what? Sure your social media accounts can help in many ways, such as building a personal brand, but they can also hurt you; so bear these tips in mind!

  • Avoid posts with provocative or inappropriate photos and information
  • Avoid posting photos of you drinking yourself into oblivion or demonstrating any drug use
  • Don’t bad mouth previous employers, make discriminatory comments related to race, gender, or religion
  • Make sure any profiles you write are free of typos, the information is coherent and applicable to your industry, or job you’re trying to land. This is particularly for LinkedIn!
  • Connect with others in your industry. LinkedIn’s Groups are an excellent place to do this
  • Engage with companies and brands you would like to work for
  • Join the conversation about industry trends on social networks, showing a potential employer how you could add value

Finally, remember at all times to be consistent. Don’t assume an employer will only be checking you out on LinkedIn. They may also check Facebook, or even Twitter and Google+. The story you tell on each site should be pretty much the same, although it’s fine to adapt the material for the site.

Be sure to check out our Vacancies, and give us a call if you need help find the right role for you or the next step in your career. We’d be happy to help.